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The Invergordon Archive

Invergordon High Street
The Invergordon Archive
Invergordon High Street

The Playhouse, Invergordon. This later became the Arts Centre.
Like the approach to window cleaning? - or is it the unofficial way to get into the Post Office! The picture was probably taken in the 1930s.
Picture added on 12 May 2004
Comments:
The original source of this picture is not clear - does it relate to your escapade when you were four? Do your parents remember where in the High Street your incident took place and in what year?
Added by Malcolm McKean on 24 June 2004
Passed onto me by my parents...I was about four years old, out with my mother Louise Coghill...while mother was conducting business...I slip away...for some reason there is a ladder against the building, unlike the one shown here. When mom tries to find me...well, the painter had to climb up and pluck me from my perch...True Story.
Added by Michael Coghill on 24 June 2004
During WWII, the queue for the pictures would go right down towards the school, with films showing on Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, and all the latest films showing. Many people went twice a week. On Wednesday night there'd usually be a dance in the Town Hall.
Added by Jet Robb (nee Andrews) on 03 September 2004
Invergordon picture house, used to frequent it faithfully every Monday and Thursday as the picture changed after Wednesday...the manager then was nick-named Ali Baba..very strict, if any noise and no-one confessed, he would toss out the whole row....It was also used as the town hall, dances were also held there....most everyone smoked back then and its a wonder you could see the screen.
Added by Harry O'Neill on 05 September 2004
Alistair Ross, the manager, had a dry sense of humour and he always noticed who you were with at the pictures even if you went in separately - the torch would shine along the row you were in! There used to be the Xmas treat when the Provost dressed as Santa and you got to see a free film - quite often Grey Friars Bobby - and then you lined up and Santa gave you an apple, orange and a sixpence. I don't know when this practice died out but imagine it was as the town grew in size.
Added by Liz Adam (Askew) on 15 April 2005
I too remember the xmas treat, but can't remember if you got it at the end of the show or before the start? Also, did we have to go up on the stage or was it handed out just at the front? Also remember the ice cream girl, think she was a Macleod....
Added by Harry O'Neill on 29 April 2005
The story of the Xmas treat is really sweet!! Little things like that make memories. I'm too young for the play house but I always look back fondly on when I was little going to the panto courtesy of Nigg. My Dad worked there and at Christmas all the employee's children would get to go to the panto in Inverness. We'd get picked up by a coach outside the now post office. We got a packed lunch on the way and on the way back would get a selection box. I remember wondering who half the children were as they weren't in Park school. In years to come I met them again in the Academy - they were South Lodgers!! Very few companies do these sorts of things now.
Added by Emma on 01 May 2005
You got it after the film, Harry. The thought was guaranteed to keep you quiet and well behaved! The provost stood below the stage at the front and you went out the side door afterwards. The usherette was called Heather Macleod.
Added by Liz Adam (Askew) on 03 May 2005
I don't think any of the kids were fooled by Santa - we all knew it was the Provost. I think there was an additional "treat" at the Queen's Coronation in 1953. I seem to remember that after the films, we were all given a commemoration mug and a small commemoration tin with Cadbury's chocolate inside. I still have my mug and the tin. I guess Santa was not involved due to it not being Christmas . Liz is correct to say we used to have to line up to get our present at the front of the stage and leave by the right hand exit at the rear of the building.
Added by Bill Geddes on 27 December 2005
I must have bought many a packet opf Butterkist from you Rosalie! I remember the icecream at the Picturehouse was "Eldorado" brand which was considered to be inferior to Walls and Lyons which were the leading brands at that time.
Added by Bill Geddes on 27 March 2006
Harry, the ice-cream girl was Kathleen Macleod. She took over from me when I went out to Singapore for a holiday with my Father. However, on my return we then shared the job. Kathleen went on to become the projectionist.
Added by Rosalie Samaroo (Graham) on 27 March 2006
Hi Rosalie, I didn't know that Kathleen became a projectionist. I remember a Sandy Stewart and a Billy Cowan being projectionists. Who was the doorman when you were the ice-cream girl? I know Mr Maclean (Kenny's father) was for a time and he was a very meek and quiet man that almost used to beg us to behave. But I can't remember who was doorman before him...do you, or anyone else remember?
Added by Harry on 24 February 2007
Hi Harry, I just can't think of the name of the doorman, maybe a Paterson. Oona(?) Calder, Mary Mellon, and Mary Russell were usherettes. Margaret Hendry was the cashier and I became the cashier after Margaret. Kathleen was a trainee projectionist with Sandy and Billy.
Added by Rosalie Graham now Samaroo on 02 March 2007
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